Donald Grant Progenitors

Genealogy

Of the

Donald Grant ANCESTRY

A Record of the Progenitors

of Donald Scott Grant

& Helen Marie Budzin

Of South Bend, Indiana

Compiled by Aubrey (Bock) Backscheider & Kathleen (Grant) Bock


“A people who takes no pride in the achievements of their remote ancestors will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered by remote descendants.” – Lord Thomas Macaulay, In & Around Swansea by E.E. Rowse 1896

“He that wishes to be counted among the benefactors of posterity must add by his own toil to the acquisitions of his ancestors, and secure his memory from neglect by some valuable improvement.” Samuel Johnson: Rambler #154 (September 7, 1751)

In Loving Memory of Randall Lee Grant 1941-2010


Table Of Contents

Donald Grant 4 SIXTH GENERATION
Helen (Budzin) Grant 10 David Grant
SECOND GENERATION Elizabeth Van Tuyl
James W Grant 14 Isaac Van Tuyl
Lillian (Lantz) Grant 18 Mary Mc Carter
Michael Budzin 22 Zacharias Beard
Stella (Bohdan) Budzin 26 Anna Maria Beard
THIRD GENERATION Jacob Byers
Ira Grant 33 Catherine Bayers
Ida (Blaine) Grant 36 James Blaine 114
Solomon Plank Lantz 40 Margaret Lyon
Maggie (Bowsher) Lantz 43 George Logan
FOURTH GENERATION Jane Blain
James Grant 45 Samuel Scott
Eliza (Beard) Grant 52 Sarah Latham
James Blain 55 Joseph Melvin 117
Jane (Scott) Blain 60 Phebe Van Vactor
Isaac Lantz 64 Christian Lantz
Saloma (Plank) Lantz 67 Barbara Kurtz
Bastien Bowsher 69 Christian Stutzman
Sophia (Kountz) Bowsher 72 Mary Beiler
FIFTH GENERATION Jacob Plank
Abraham Grant 74 Mary Yoder
Sarah Van Tuyl 78 John Zook
George Beard 80 Catherine Weidman
Catherine Byers 82 Anthony Bowsher 121
Alexander Blaine 87 Christine Reichenfelder
Mary Margaret Logan 89 Michael Treace 125
John C Scott 91 Rachel Dreece
Elizabeth Melvin 93 John Koontz
Soloman Lantz 95 Mary Jane Crum
Anna Stutzman 97 John Catt
Jeptha Plank 98 Catherine Mason
Barbara Zook 101 Kathleen Grant Genetic report 127
Daniel Bowsher 103 Grant Ahnentafel (Rootsmagic) 133
Mary Treece 109 Index of Names 185
Michael Koontz 111 Index of Places 196
Elisabeth Catt 113


Top: Donald Scott Grant, birth certificate number 4770-171, 1906, Whitley County Board of Health, Division of Vital Records, Columbia City, Indiana.

Bottom: Donald Scott Grant, death certificate number 88011589, 1988, Indiana State Board of Health, South Bend, Indiana.



Top: Mishawaka High School. Donald Scott Grant Diploma 1924. Privately held by Aubrey Backscheider, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017. Bottom: Mishawaka High School Basketball team, ca. 1918, Mishawaka, Indiana; Privately Held by Kathleen Grant; Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.


Top: Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity Revue Publication, Privately held by Kathleen Bock, citing record from 06/3/1931 page 3.

Bottom: Phi Delta Kappa Member Photograph, ca. 1930; Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati Ohio 2017.

Top: Mishawaka Ball-Band Records. Donald S Grant Foreman’s Club Certification, 1968. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017. Bottom left: Inscription found on reverse side of drawing depicting Grant coat of arms that previously hung in the home of Donald and Helen Grant.

Bottom right: Donald Scott Grant Portrait taken at Ball-Band, Mishawaka, ca. 1958; Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati Ohio 2017. Bottom Right: Donald Scott Grant posing with his four brothers next to the St. Joseph River, ca. 1958; Left to right: Robert L Grant, Herb D Grant, Donald S Grant, James M Grant. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati Ohio 2017.


Top Left: Donald S Grant Reunion Speech ca 1974, written for the 50th anniversary of Mishawaka High School class of 1924. Top Right: Donald Grant with his three children: Randall, Donald, and Kathleen, ca. 1968; Celebration of the Graduation of Randall Grant. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati Ohio 2017. Bottom: South Bend Tribune database, 1974, South Bend Public Library, MHS Class of ’24 Celebrates Golden Anniversary. 06/1/1974 page 32:3.





Top page 10: Saint Monica School, Mishawaka Indiana. Helen Budzin Diploma 1928. Privately held by Aubrey Backscheider, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.

Bottom Left page 10: South Bend Tribune Newspaper database, St. Joseph Public Library Main Branch, Donald S Grant and Helen Marie Budzin marriage announcement citing record from 08/18/1934.

Bottom center page 10: Helen Marie Budzin High School Graduation Portrait, ca. 1928; Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati Ohio 2017.

Bottom right page 10: South Bend Tribune Newspaper database, St. Joseph Public Library Main Branch, Helen M Grant Obituary, citing record from 07/2/1993.

Above: Helen Marie Grant, death certificate number 93028576, 1993, Indiana State Department of Health, Division of Vital Records, South Bend, Indiana.

Left: Randall, Helen, and Donald Grant, ca 1950. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati Ohio 2017.

Right: Helen M Budzin School Portrait, ca 1920. Privately held by Kim Magnuson, Elkhart Indiana 2017.

Bottom: Donald and Helen Grant on Vacation, ca 1980. Privately held by Aubrey Backscheider, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.




Top Left: James W. Grant, death certificate, 1947, St. Joseph County Health Department, Division of Vital Records, South Bend, Indiana. Top Right: South Bend Tribune Newspaper database, St. Joseph County Public Library Main Branch, James W Grant Obituary, citing record from 03/1/1947. Bottom Left: James & Lillian Grant in South Bend, Indiana, ca. 1940; Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017. Bottom Right: South Bend Tribune Newspaper database, St. Joseph County Public Library Main Branch, James W Grant and Lillian Lantz Marriage Announcement, citing record from 01/25/1900.

Bottom Left:
Bock, Kathleen Lillian. “Genealogy Journal.” Cincinnati, Ohio, 1978-1998. Privately held by Aubrey Backscheider, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.

Bottom Right: Grant, Lillian Lantz, Family Bible Records, 1900-1975. The Holy Bible. Publisher Unknown. Privately held by Donald R Grant, Gwynedd Valley, Pennsylvania 2017.




Top left page 18: Lillian Grant and Donald S Grant South Bend, Indiana, ca. 1925; Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.

Top right page 18: Common Township High School Graduates 1885-1907 Albion, Indiana. Index obtained from record book at Noble County Library, Albion Indiana 2004.

Bottom left page 18: Lillian Lantz Grant Portrait South Bend, Indiana, ca. 1965; Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.

Bottom right page 18: The Carillion, First United Methodist Church South Bend Indiana. Citing Poem by Lillian Grant, 3/2/1975.

Left:
Grant, Lillian Lantz. “Diary.” South Bend, Indiana 1896-1975. Privately held by Aubrey Backscheider, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.

Top: Over-Eighty Club, South Bend Indiana ca 1970. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.

Bottom Left: South Bend Tribune Newspaper database, St. Joseph County Public Library, Main Branch. Reflections at Over 80, citing record from 1972.

Top Written on Back: Taken 915 E. Lawrence St, Mishawaka. Grampa Bohdan on right, Uncle John Pluta on left, Mother Stella, sister Leona & Dad Michael Buzin. Seated on step: Victor, Helen, Michael Jr, William.

Bottom:
“United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database with images, FamilySearch: 12 December 2014), Michael Budzen, 1917-1918; citing St. Joseph County, Indiana, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,653,193.




Top Left: Michael Budzin, Portrait circa 1930. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.

Top Right: Michael & William Budzin circa 1944. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.

Bottom: “Illinois, Northern District Naturalization Index, 1840-1950,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XKL6-SYL : 12 December 2014), Michael Buditz Or Budzin, 1943; citing South Bend, Indiana, NARA microfilm publication M1285 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 13; FHL microfilm 1,432,013.

Top Left: Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original data: Indiana State Board of Health. Death Certificates, 1900–2011. Microfilm. Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Top Right: South Bend Tribune Newspaper Database, St. Joseph Public Library Main Branch. MJ Budzin Obituary, citing Record from 10/22/1960.

Bottom: Michael & Stella Budzin Wedding Portrait, ca 1909, Flushing NY. Privately held by Donald S Grant, Gwynedd Valley, PA.


Top Left: Stella Budzin, Certificate of Death number 041790, 1967, Indiana State Board of Health, Division of Vital Records, South Bend, Indiana.

Top Right: South Bend Tribune Newspaper Database, St. Joseph Public Library Main Branch. Stella Budzin Obituary, citing Record from 11/3/1967. Bottom: Photo taken from Mishawaka Remembered by South Bend Tribune, 2003. Fourth man from the right is Michael Budzin. Stella’s brother, Charles Bohdan, is in the center.


Bottom Left: Leona Knoblock, Stella Budzin, Helen Grant circa 1940, South Bend, IN. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, OH 2017.

Bottom Right: Stella Budzin and Helen Grant circa 1950, South Bend, IN. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, OH 2017.

Pages 27-30: Last Will and Testament of Stella M Budzin, 1967. St. Joseph County Archives, 1140 S. Lafayette Blvd., South Bend, IN 46601.






Top Left: Michael and Stella Budzin portrait, ca 1955. Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati Ohio, 2017. Top Right: Stella Budzin, Helen and Donald Grant ca 1934. Priately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati Ohio, 2017.

Bottom Left: South Bend Tribune Newspaper Database, St. Joseph Public Library Main Branch. Leona Knoblock Obituary, citing Record from 10/17/2003.

Bottom Center: South Bend Tribune Newspaper Database, St. Joseph Public Library Main Branch. Casimir Bohdan Obituary, citing Record from 12/22/1971.

Bottom Right:
“Illinois, Northern District Naturalization Index, 1840-1950,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XKL6-2G3 : 12 December 2014), Casimir Wilhelm Bohdan, 1924; citing South Bend, Indiana, NARA microfilm publication M1285 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 13; FHL microfilm 1,432,013.

Ira R. Grant

1849 – 4 July 1894 • LH3Q­DD6



Left: Whitley County, Indiana, marriage certificate no. 245 (1873), Grant-Blaine; Privately held by Kathleen Bock, Cincinnati, Ohio 2017.


Columbia City Newspaper, Indiana. Peabody Public Library. Ira Grant Obituary, citing record from 7/4/1894.




Page 37: Columbia City Post Newspaper, Indiana. Peabody Public Library. Ida Grant Obituary, citing record from 1/30/1931.

Top left: Columbia City City Directory, 1909. Peabody Public Library. Page unknown.

Top Right: Columbia City City Directory, 1918. Peabody Public Library. Page 27.

Bottom: Grant Family Portrait, ca 1900. Privately held by Kim Magnuson, Elkhart Indiana.





Top: Certificate of Marriage, Haw Patch Indiana 1874. Bowser-Lantz. Bottom Left: Solomon P Lantz pictures with his three children Eva, Lillian, and Harry ca 1930. Privately held by Donald Grant, Gwynedd Valley, PA 2017. Bottom right: Solomon P Lantz Obituary, privately held by Donald Grant, Gwynedd Valley, PA 2017.





















Top: History of Whitley County, Indiana By Samuel P. Kaler, Richard H. Maring


Top: History of Whitley County, Indiana by By Samuel P. Kaler, Richard H. Maring

Bottom: Middle: Counties of Whitley and Noble, Indiana: Historical and Biographical By Weston Arthur Goodspeed







1860 Menonite youth group, La Grange Indiana.










Abraham Grant

1766 – 1835 • LZGR­4JT






George Beard

3 March 1783 – January 1826 • LHDJ­4SX























Wayne County Ohio Courthouse, ca 1868.


























Research of:

Robert K Bruders

4620 SE Salquist Road

Gresham, OR 97080

United States

bruman7@attbi.com

1808: moved to Ohio, locating on the Scioto near Circleville, Pickaway County [Ref: Harter REICHELDERFER p32]

1808: Families of Anthony, Peter, and Peter Harpster made the overland journey to Ohio. They located on the Scioto above Circleville, on a tract of land known as the “island”. At some prehistoric time the river changed its course and cut off the hill portion where Anthony built his home, hence the name, “Island” home. [Ref: Burkhardt BOUCHER p89]

1812: The War of 1812 followed closely the founding of the “Island” home and four of the sons enlisted in the Second War of Independence. [Ref: Burkhardt BOUCHER p89]

Received a pension for service as private under Capts. Peter Spangler and Whetstone, Colonel Lindimute, Pennsylvania troops. [Ref: DAR #132588, DAR #127627]

1830 Census of Washington Twp, Pickaway Co, OH, p7, listed as “Anthony Bowsher Sr” with only one free white male age 70-80 [Ref: 1830 BOWSHER Anthony]

Mar 4 1831: started receiving pension from Rev War service [Ref: Baker BOWSHER p13]

will dated Jun 4 1828, pro Feb 2 1835. 152 acres to go to son Anthony, $50 to daughters Catherine Justice and Barbara Buck, $10 to son Daniel in leiu of a gun that was given to each of the other sons. Remainder of estate was divided equally among Peter, Henry, John, Jacob, Daniel, William, Elizabeth Harpster, Catherine Justice, and Barbara Buck [Ref: Baker BOWSHER p13]

Will probated Feb 2 1835. Mentions sons Anthony Jr, Peter, Henry, John, Jacob, david, and William; daughters Catherine wife of Jessie Justice, Barbara wife of John Buck, and Elizabeth Harpster. Executor Anthony Jr. Witnesses Henry Conrad and Wm. Galbreath. [Ref: PickawayCoOH WillAbs p189]

Anthony died about 1837, and was buried in an unmarked grave in the family cemetery near the old homestead. [Ref: Burkhardt BOUCHER p89]

Will, probated in Pickaway Co, Oh, Book II, p190-193:

In the name of God Aman. I Anthony Bowsher Senr. of the County of Pickaway and State of Ohio being weak in body but of sound mind and memmory thanks to God therefor and well knowing that tis appointed for all me_ to die, do make ordain and publish this my last will and testament of all my real and personal property that I may died seized with or belonging to me in any manner whatsoever. First) I will and ordain that my body my be buried in a decent & Christian like manner, and that my executors so soon after my decease as possible, do pay all my just debts out of my estate as soon as possible after my decease, and as touching the residue of my estate I will and bequeath in the following manner–secondly) I will and bequeath unto my son Anthony Bowsher Junr one hundred and fifty two acres of land lying and being in the County of Pickaway and in the State of Ohio it being the same tract of land that I now live on, as will more fully appear, by a deed of conveyance made by me on the fourth day of June in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight. Thirdly, I will and bequeath unto my daughter Catherine Justice, formerly Catherine Bowsher, now the wife of Jesse Justice, the sum of Fifty dollars to be paid out of my estate by my Executor and my personal property, but if there should not be sufficant to pay this bequest, then my Executor to pay the same out of his own estate, by my having this this day willed and bequeathed to him over one hundred and fifty two acres, as well as executed to him a deed of conveyance to him bearing even date of this will. Fourthly, I will and bequeath unto my daughter Barbara Buck, formerly Barbara Bowsher, now the wife of John Buck, the sum of Fifty dollars to be paid in the same manner as the bequest to Catherine Justice (the bequests to be paid within two years after my decease by my executor without delay). Fifthly, I will and bequeath unto my son David Bowsher ten dollars by my executor out of my estate within one year after my decease, this bequest is made to him in liew of a gunn given to all the rest of my sons. Sixthly, I will and ordain that all the residue of my estate that I may died siezed with, or debts, money and every thing that I may hold by just right to me equally divided among my sons and daughters (namely) Peter Bowsher, Henry Bowsher, John Bowsher, Jacob Bowsher, David Bowsher, William Bowsher, and my daughters Elizabeth Harpster, formerly Elizabeth Bowsher, and Catherine Justice, formerly Catherine Bowsher, and Barbary Buck, formerly Barbary Bowsher, or their assighns to be paid to them as soon as my executor shall be able to make a final settlement with and make a sale of all and every of my estate at Public Vendue, with the execption of the before mentioned bequests, and I expressly enjoin that my executor do pay over to my sons and daughters the before mentioned bequests immediately, to them my heirs or their assighns. Lastly I nominate constitute and appoint my son Anthony Bowsher Junior, the sole Executor of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all any former wills and testaments by me made or intended to be made by me in (toto) of any kind whatsoever. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this fourth day of June in year of Our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight. Anthony Bowsher.

Signed, sealed published and declared by the said testator, Anthony Bowsher Senior to be his last will and testament in the presence of us who in his presence, have hereunto set our hands & anmes thereunto, Henry Coonrad, Wm Galbeth.


Michael Dreese Treece

1745 – 1 August 1812 • L6DP­GQ4



Kathy Bock

Ancestry Composition

Ancestry Composition

Your genome tells the unique story of your ancestry: where your ancestors lived, when they contributed to your family tree, and how their DNA was passed down to you through your parents. For more information about your results, see Frequently Asked Questions.

Kathy Bock    100%

European

British & Irish

7.1%

French & German

6.8%

Scandinavian

6.4%

Broadly Northwestern European

28.0%

Balkan

1.3%

Broadly Southern European

0.6%

Your Ancestry Timeline

How many generations ago was your most recent ancestor for each population?

How to interpret this result

    This module uses your Ancestry Composition results to estimate the generation range where you are likely to have had a single relative who descended from a single population.

    These results may be helpful for learning about your genealogy, in figuring out from which ancestors a particular ancestry may have been inherited, or for piecing together the history of their likely migrations.

    For technical details on how this feature works, read our white paper.

Your Ancestry Composition Chromosome Painting

These are your chromosomes; we’ve painted them with your Ancestry Composition results. The first 22 are called autosomes and come in pairs of two, each represented by one of the colored horizontal lines in the graphic below. Chromosomes have different lengths, and are named 1 through 22, when sorted by size (scientists are not very creative). Lastly, we also look at ancestry on your X chromosome: two copies like the autosomes if you are female, and only one copy if you’re male (that you got from mom).

    Kathy Bock    100%

Genotype data is not available for these regions because their genetic sequence is highly repetitive, and therefore not readily tested via current genotyping technology.

Broad regional assignments: Sometimes a piece of DNA matches a regional population but cannot be assigned to a more specific population. In such a case we assign the DNA “broadly” to that regional population rather than a specific one.

Do more with your Ancestry Composition results.

Maternal Haplogroup

You descend from a long line of women that can be traced back to eastern Africa over 150,000 years ago. These are the women of your maternal line, and your maternal haplogroup sheds light on their story.

Kathy, you belong to maternal haplogroup U3a1.

As our ancestors ventured out of eastern Africa, they branched off in diverse groups that crossed and recrossed the globe over tens of thousands of years. Some of their migrations can be traced through haplogroups, families of lineages that descend from a common ancestor. Your maternal haplogroup can reveal the path followed by the women of your maternal line. Migrations of Your Maternal Line

180,000 Years Ago Haplogroup L

If every person living today could trace his or her maternal line back over thousands of generations, all of our lines would meet at a single woman who lived in eastern Africa between 150,000 and 200,000 years ago. Though she was one of perhaps thousands of women alive at the time, only the diverse branches of her haplogroup have survived to today. The story of your maternal line begins with her.

65,000 Years Ago

Haplogroup L3

Your branch of L is haplogroup L3, which arose from a woman who likely lived in eastern Africa between 60,000 and 70,000 years ago. While many of her descendants remained in Africa, one small group ventured east across the Red Sea, likely across the narrow Bab-el-Mandeb into the tip of the Arabian Peninsula.

59,000 Years Ago

Haplogroup N

Your story continues with haplogroup N, one of two branches that arose from L3 in southwestern Asia. Researchers have long debated whether they arrived there via the Sinai Peninsula, or made the hop across the Red Sea at the Bab-elMandeb. Though their exact routes are disputed, there is no doubt that the women of haplogroup N migrated across all of Eurasia, giving rise to new branches from Portugal to Polynesia.

57,000 Years Ago Haplogroup R

One of those branches is haplogroup R, which traces back to a woman who lived soon after the migration out of Africa. She likely lived in southwest Asia, perhaps in the Arabian peninsula, and her descendants lived and migrated alongside members of haplogroup N. Along the way, R gave rise to a number of branches that are major haplogroups in their own right.

47,000 Years Ago

Haplogroup U

Haplogroup U was one of the earliest offshoots of R, and traces back to a woman who lived nearly 50,000 years ago. Over time, her descendants have migrated into Europe, parts of Asia, and even back into Africa, giving rise to numerous branches spanning the three continents.

33,000 Years Ago

Origin and Migrations of Haplogroup U3

U3 originated after modern humans expanded out of Africa into the Middle East about 45,000 years ago. The two subgroups of U3, called U3a and U3b, appear to have originated sometime before the last Glacial Maximum more than 21,000 years ago. Many individuals carrying U3 still occupy this ancestral homeland. U3 occurs at about 40% in the Jordanians from the Dead Sea, and at 5% in other populations from the Arabian Peninsula. The particularly high frequency of U3 in the Jordanian population is likely due to a founder effect, population growth from only a few individuals. Similarly, groups in the Caucasus Mountains like the Adygei and Nogay carry elevated levels of U3 (5-15%) but have very little genetic diversity in the U3 haplogroup, indicating a recent founder event.

After its origin in the Middle East, U3 was likely present in some of the first farmers who, after adopting wheat agriculture and herds of cattle or sheep, began expanding beyond the Fertile Crescent. One group may have carried haplogroup U3 into Central Asia and India. Another group likely headed West through Turkey into the European continent about 12,0008,000 years ago. Haplogroup U3 is relatively rare in mainland Europe today, reaching levels above 1% in some Italian and Iberian populations.

U3a1

9,000 Years Ago

Your maternal haplogroup, U3a1, traces back to a woman who lived approximately 9,000 years ago.

That’s nearly 360 generations ago! What happened between then and now? As researchers and citizen scientists discover more about your haplogroup, new details may be added to the story of your maternal line.

Today U3a1 is relatively common among 23andMe customers.

Today, you share your haplogroup with all the maternal-line descendants of the    1 in 240 common ancestor of U3a1, including other 23andMe customers.    23andMe customers share your haplogroup assignment.

The culture and music of the Spanish Roma influenced Flamenco.

Haplogroup U3 is most common among the Roma people, also known as the Gypsies. The Roma migrated to southeastern Europe from northern India during the Middle Ages, and then spread throughout the continent. As they historically rarely intermarried with other Europeans they have retained the signatures of this westward migration.

Up to 55% of the Roma today have mitochondrial DNA belonging to U3. Since this haplogroup is common in Spanish, Lithuanian and Polish Roma it probably became incorporated into the Roma population before they diverged throughout Europe.

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